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audience_interaction [2013/06/03 21:04]
kzbichorski
audience_interaction [2013/06/04 18:14] (current)
agoldberg
Line 15: Line 15:
 Like many kinds of improvised music, there is a "​dynamic relationship"​ between the audience and the performer. ​ When someone in the audience specifically likes a part of the music, "he might call out any of a number of cliched words or phrases with which to show his appreciation"​. ​ There are often wild cheers of approval that can encourage the soloist (Marcus 1992). Like many kinds of improvised music, there is a "​dynamic relationship"​ between the audience and the performer. ​ When someone in the audience specifically likes a part of the music, "he might call out any of a number of cliched words or phrases with which to show his appreciation"​. ​ There are often wild cheers of approval that can encourage the soloist (Marcus 1992).
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 +===Free Improvisation===
 +The audience plays an interesting role in the world of free improvisation,​ in that, for the most part, there isn't much of an audience. The general discordance of free improvisation alienates many, and merely being an attentive listener constitutes a sincere gesture of patronage. Gavin Bryars reflected on the audience of Derek Bailey and his first forays into free improvisation,​ regarding them with surprised appreciation and humility. "There was a social aspect to the activity and there was some sort of respect - a recognition of our seriousness. It was certainly quite different from most other jazz clubs in the area. I think one reason that the audience stuck with us was that the music did have a powerful dramatic quality. There was a sense of expectancy, things did change and resolve, and so it had a kind of drama" (Bailey 1980:​107). ​
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 +Further, in his essay Hidden Principles of Improvisation,​ Jacques Coursil asserts that the less cliched improvised music is, the more united the audience and musicians become: "in improvised music, the player hears and discovers the sounds he is playing at the same time as any listener (he is one of them and not in front of them). Unless he plays cliches, he does not have a head start on neither the forms nor the notes he plays; he is, as everybody around him, a listener. The synchronous point constitutes a primary feature of socialization,​ as it brings together all the participants in a single "​intuition of the instant,"​ as Bachelard has written"​ (Zorn 2008: 61)." ​