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cognitive_development [2011/05/09 11:31]
ewatson [How do we know?]
cognitive_development [2011/05/09 21:01] (current)
ewatson [How do we know?]
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 Production of two separate languages involves the executive control system because the child must switch constantly switch attention to the target language (Bialystock 2009). This may lead to the executive control system being more efficient in other areas as well. Production of two separate languages involves the executive control system because the child must switch constantly switch attention to the target language (Bialystock 2009). This may lead to the executive control system being more efficient in other areas as well.
 ==== How do we know? ==== ==== How do we know? ====
-Many studies have investigated differences in bilingual and monolingual children'​s performances on various tasks that measure executive control. For example, Bialystock (1988) found that bilingual children performed better in detecting grammatical errors that required controlled attention and inhibition. This finding extended to nonverbal tasks as well: bilingual children were able to solve problems that contained conflicting cues compared to monolinguals (Zelazo, Frye and Rapis 1996). ​ These tasks involved attending to certain features and ignoring irrelavent stimuli to sort stimuli by different features (such as color or shape). Bilingual children have also been found to have faster reaction times for solving problems (Bialystock 2009)+Many studies have investigated differences in bilingual and monolingual children'​s performances on various tasks that measure executive control. For example, Bialystock (1988) found that bilingual children performed better in detecting grammatical errors that required controlled attention and inhibition. This finding extended to nonverbal tasks as well: bilingual children were able to solve problems that contained conflicting cues compared to monolinguals (Zelazo, Frye and Rapus 1996). ​ These tasks involved attending to certain features and ignoring irrelavent stimuli to sort stimuli by different features (such as color or shape). Bilingual children have also been found to have faster reaction times for solving problems (Bialystock 2009)