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cross-linguistic_influence [2011/05/15 20:02]
shaoul
cross-linguistic_influence [2011/05/15 20:02]
shaoul
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 ======== Cross-linguistic Influence ======== ======== Cross-linguistic Influence ========
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-Although most research supports the dual language system hypothesis, the two languages still interact during development. When the two languages interact with each other, they cause a transfer of grammatical properties from one language to the next. A great example of this is illustrated when a child moves the placement of a subject or an object based on the rules from one language into a sentence uttered in the other language- the word order was changed. For example, a French-English bilingual child might state: ‘the baby drink not the milk.’ In French, the ‘not’ is placed after the main verb, where in English it wouldn’t be placed there. If this happens consistently,​ we can assume that the child’s English grammar skills acquired a French grammar rule. There are also subtle cross-linguistic effects like the omission of subjects before verbs in Spanish-English speaking children. One explanation for this phenomenon is a child’s dominant proficiency in a language can cross linguistically influence the non-dominant language. This is not the same as unitary language system because the resulting utterance does not result from the blending of languages. They are not permanent in a child’s language; it is just a part of the developmental process(Crago et al.,​2011) ​+Although most research supports the dual language system hypothesis, the two languages still interact during development. When the two languages interact with each other, they cause a transfer of grammatical properties from one language to the next. A great example of this is illustrated when a child moves the placement of a subject or an object based on the rules from one language into a sentence uttered in the other language- the word order was changed. For example, a French-English bilingual child might state: ‘the baby drink not the milk.’ In French, the ‘not’ is placed after the main verb, where in English it wouldn’t be placed there. If this happens consistently,​ we can assume that the child’s English grammar skills acquired a French grammar rule. There are also subtle cross-linguistic effects like the omission of subjects before verbs in Spanish-English speaking children. One explanation for this phenomenon is a child’s dominant proficiency in a language can cross linguistically influence the non-dominant language. This is not the same as unitary language system because the resulting utterance does not result from the blending of languages. They are not permanent in a child’s language; it is just a part of the developmental process (Crago et al., 2011)