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early_onset_and_causes [2011/05/04 18:14]
lsegal
early_onset_and_causes [2011/05/04 19:20] (current)
jleabman
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   * Onset is usually reported to occur between 32 and 46 months. However, it is likely that the child had symptoms before this point.   * Onset is usually reported to occur between 32 and 46 months. However, it is likely that the child had symptoms before this point.
  
 +{{:​topic-stuttering-children.jpg|}}
        
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 =====Levels of Progression in Stuttering: Three Views===== =====Levels of Progression in Stuttering: Three Views=====
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   * The secondary stage is is entered when a child is aware of the speech abnormalities and must physically struggle against mental blocks during speech. Avoidance, substitutions,​ and other associated behaviors emerge during the secondary stage   * The secondary stage is is entered when a child is aware of the speech abnormalities and must physically struggle against mental blocks during speech. Avoidance, substitutions,​ and other associated behaviors emerge during the secondary stage
  
-=====Bloodstein's "Four Phases"​======+__Bloodstein's "Four Phases"​__
   * Phase I occurs during preschool years. Difficulties are episodic, mixed with normal speech, and may be overlooked or go unnoticed. Stuttering is conditional,​ and usually triggered by intense emotions, an overwhelming amount of speech, or pressure to communicate. Repetition is the main symptom, and should be fairly noticeable. Most children show little to no concern about the abnormalities.   * Phase I occurs during preschool years. Difficulties are episodic, mixed with normal speech, and may be overlooked or go unnoticed. Stuttering is conditional,​ and usually triggered by intense emotions, an overwhelming amount of speech, or pressure to communicate. Repetition is the main symptom, and should be fairly noticeable. Most children show little to no concern about the abnormalities.
   * Phase II is during elementary school. The disorder is now chronic. The child knows that he/she stutters, yet still does not have much concern about the disorder. Symptoms tend to increase when the child is extremely excited or speaking quickly.   * Phase II is during elementary school. The disorder is now chronic. The child knows that he/she stutters, yet still does not have much concern about the disorder. Symptoms tend to increase when the child is extremely excited or speaking quickly.
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   * Phase IV is late adolescence,​ and may extend into adulthood. Extremely fearful anticipations of stuttering, as well as the fear of certain words, sounds, and situations themselves. The stutterer is now habitually avoiding words, speech situations, or other emotional situations.   * Phase IV is late adolescence,​ and may extend into adulthood. Extremely fearful anticipations of stuttering, as well as the fear of certain words, sounds, and situations themselves. The stutterer is now habitually avoiding words, speech situations, or other emotional situations.
  
-=====Van ​Riper' Four Tracks=====+__Van Riper' Four Tracks__
   * A good amount of consistencies with Bloodstein'​s model   * A good amount of consistencies with Bloodstein'​s model
   * Asserted that each person'​s exact path of development is different. More specifically,​ he believed in four paths of development.   * Asserted that each person'​s exact path of development is different. More specifically,​ he believed in four paths of development.
   * First path of development is similar to Bloodstein'​s phases, the rest are very different   * First path of development is similar to Bloodstein'​s phases, the rest are very different
  
-======General Progression===== +__General Progression__ 
- +  * All of these views describe stuttering as gradual
- * All of these views describe stuttering as gradual+