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forms_of_improvised_music [2013/06/03 21:24]
kzbichorski
forms_of_improvised_music [2013/06/03 23:05] (current)
vmiller
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 Structure:​\\ Structure:​\\
  
-The largest structural element is the palos (types of songs). There are about twelve of the basic and most familiar song types. About two dozen other variants also exist. All of these variations of the Flamenco song can be differentiated through different poetic form, melodies, meter patterns, and guitar accompaniment patterns (Manuel[2011222).+The largest structural element is the palos (types of songs). There are about twelve of the basic and most familiar song types. About two dozen other variants also exist. All of these variations of the Flamenco song can be differentiated through different poetic form, melodies, meter patterns, and guitar accompaniment patterns (Manuel 2011:222).
  
 On a smaller structural level, Flamenco music has several established elements that are found in all of its musical styles. An introduction on guitar sets the tempo and rhythmic pattern. Then verses (coplas) are played or sung with interludes, called falsetas, on the guitar. These falsetas may or may not have a repeated structure (ex. commonly an small-scale AAB pattern). There also will often be a closing copla to wrap things up. While each piece contains these structural elements of an introduction,​ coplas, falsetas, and closing, the proportion of each section and the overall length of the piece are variable (Bailey 1980: 23). Since the coplas are additive, there is no overall structure as there usually is in Western forms of improvisation - for example, the AABA form in jazz.\\ On a smaller structural level, Flamenco music has several established elements that are found in all of its musical styles. An introduction on guitar sets the tempo and rhythmic pattern. Then verses (coplas) are played or sung with interludes, called falsetas, on the guitar. These falsetas may or may not have a repeated structure (ex. commonly an small-scale AAB pattern). There also will often be a closing copla to wrap things up. While each piece contains these structural elements of an introduction,​ coplas, falsetas, and closing, the proportion of each section and the overall length of the piece are variable (Bailey 1980: 23). Since the coplas are additive, there is no overall structure as there usually is in Western forms of improvisation - for example, the AABA form in jazz.\\