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neural_organization_of_signed_and_spoken_language [2011/04/15 09:38]
ljgarten
neural_organization_of_signed_and_spoken_language [2011/04/15 10:13]
ljgarten
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 In addition, research shows major contributions from areas such as the basal ganglia and temporal gyrus for language, which also play a role in a variety of cognitive processes. ​ These areas along with other multi-function brain regions support the notion of wide-reaching and dynamic capabilities of brain structures for varying modalities. ​ In addition, research shows major contributions from areas such as the basal ganglia and temporal gyrus for language, which also play a role in a variety of cognitive processes. ​ These areas along with other multi-function brain regions support the notion of wide-reaching and dynamic capabilities of brain structures for varying modalities. ​
  
-====== Simultaneous Learning ======+===== Simultaneous Learning ===== 
 +The ability for an individual to utilize both a spoken language and a signed language is known as bimodal bilingualism. ​ It commonly occurs in hearing children of deaf parents, who learn spoken language from speaking relatives or teachers and sign language from their parents. ​ This capability is a unique and interesting form of bilingualism because it requires distinct sensory-motor systems. ​ Neural organization seems to lend itself to flexible progressions for controlling,​ processing, and representing two languages. ​ Bimodal bilinguals display a relationship between linguistic and non-linguistic function and second language acquisition. ​ Acquiring a signed language has shown to contribute to enhancements in a variety of non-linguistic visuospatial abilities. ​ These abilities are related to processing requirements for sign language as well.
  
 ===== Sources ===== ===== Sources =====
-HarleyT.A. (2008). ​//The Psychology ​of Language// ​Psychology Press.+EmmoreyK., & McCullough, S. (2008). ​ The bimodal bilingual brain: Effects ​of sign language experience. ​ //Brain & Language ​117//(2), 53-62. doi:​10.1016/​j.bandl.2008.03.005
  
 +Harley, T.A. (2008). //The Psychology of Language// London: Psychology Press.
 + 
 Hickok, G., Bellugi, U., & Klima, E.S. (1996). ​ The neurobiology of sign language and  Hickok, G., Bellugi, U., & Klima, E.S. (1996). ​ The neurobiology of sign language and 
 its implications for the neural basis of language. ​ 699-702 its implications for the neural basis of language. ​ 699-702